Adolecent dating abuse in canada

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For Immediate Release – August 4, 2009 (Toronto) – A school-based program that integrates information about healthy relationships into the existing ninth-grade curriculum appears to reduce adolescent dating violence and increase condom use two and a half years later, according to a report from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).The effects of the low-cost intervention implemented in some Ontario schools appear stronger in boys.This is also an important topic from a gender studies perspective as almost 32% of male adolescents engage in some form of violence, whether sexual, physical or emotional, towards their partners while adolescent violence from females is nearly half of that rate.The literature on IPV among adolescents indicates that the rates are similar for the number of girls and boys in heterosexual relationships who report experiencing IPV, or that girls in heterosexual relationships are more likely than their male counterparts to report perpetrating IPV. stated that, unlike domestic violence in general, equal rates of IPV perpetration is a unique characteristic with regard adolescent dating violence, and that this is "perhaps because the period of adolescence, a special developmental state, is accompanied by sexual characteristics that are distinctly different from the characteristics of adult." Wekerle and Wolfe theorized that "a mutually coercive and violent dynamic may form during adolescence, a time when males and females are more equal on a physical level" and that this "physical equality allows girls to assert more power through physical violence than is possible for an adult female attacked by a fully physically mature man." Regarding studies that indicate that girls are as likely or more likely than boys to commit IPV, the authors emphasize that substantial differences exist between the genders, including that girls are significantly more likely than boys to report having experienced severe IPV, such as being threatened with a weapon, punched, strangled, beaten, burned, or raped, and are also substantially more likely than boys to need psychological help or experience physical injuries that require medical help for the abuse, and to report sexual violence as a part of dating violence."When I talk to adolescents, they may not recognize that what they're experiencing is dating violence," says Exner-Cortens.

She claimed it was rape, he claimed it was consensual, and a jury acquitted him of the charges.A two-year age difference isn’t particularly alarming, and dating is fairly standard at that age.But if these teens are having sex, and you live in a state where prosecutors aggressively enforce the law, it’s possible that your son could be charged with statutory rape.So, from a primary prevention — or stopping before it starts — standpoint, we want to be communicating healthy relationships messages to adolescents."That you have a right to be safe in your relationship, and if a partner ever makes you feel unsafe or hurts you, that's not okay, and you have a right to leave and seek help." Exner-Cortens' study, recently published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, analyzed a sample of 2,161 American male and female heterosexual youth, interviewing them about dating when they were ages 12 to 18, and then again five and 12 years later.

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